Learn about essential oils

Essential Oils Revolution 2

For those wanting to learn as much as possible about essential oils and the way to use them properly in your day to day life, I can think of no better opportunity than the coming series of online talks: Essential Oils Revolution 2.

Following on the heels of Essential Oils Revolution 2015, where over 160,000 people tuned in, this series promises to be quite interesting covering topics such as:

  • The truth about “therapeutic grade”, synthetics, and the most commonly adulterated oils.
  • How essential oils, homeopathy, and nutrition work together.
  • Practical tips for cooking with essential oils and integrating them into the recipes you love.
  • Effective oils to combat drug-resistant bacteria and how they are being used in community healthcare.
  • Combining frequency medicine with essential oils for healing emotions.
  • Oils for mood management, stress, anxiety, and better sleep.
  • Using oils for learning disabilities, ADHD, and special needs children.
  • Beating Lyme disease, improving blood sugar, and rebalancing your hormones with oils.
  • Reversing the 4 stages of trauma and using aromatherapy for coping with fear.
  • The different types of grief and how to help a mourning loved one with oils.
  • Preventing PTSD in first responders and service workers.
  • Preventing and treating yeast and fungal infections with oils.
  • Favorite oils for digestion, detoxification, skincare, and anti-aging.
  • Remedies for dandruff, athlete’s foot, and sugar cravings.

The talks are free and online, and they begin on August 22nd. To register click here.

A number of people have told me they won’t be able to attend all the talks, or that they’re at an inconvenient time. Not a problem you will be to acquire the downloads, including the transcripts. Click here for those.



Essential Oils Revolution 2 - Order the talks

Essential oils for the festive seasonEssential oils are very potent through our sense of smell; and our sense of smell is one of the strongest triggers for emotions and memory. Essential oils have also been used for thousands of years to enhance human spiritual awareness, whether that be through prayer, meditation or some other spiritual practice. With that in mind I wanted to share with you two essential oil blends that are very much suited to the season of Christmas: Christmas Spirit™ and Three(3) Wise Men™

Christmas Spirit™

Christmas Spirit™ is a blend of citrus (orange), spice (cinnamon) and evergreen (spruce) reminiscent of northern winter holidays, and recalling feelings of joy and happiness that are associated with the festive season. The aroma from this blend will help you create a rich and spiritually uplifting aroma in your home during the holiday season and all year round. The oils that make up this blend are pretty amazing.

Orange. Includes the naturally occurring compound d-limonene – a potent antioxidant. It also helps maintain a healthy digestive system. On the emotional level, it’s elevating to the mind, bringing feelings of joy and peace.

Cinnamon Bark. Cinnamon Bark has been used for thousands of years and is associated with abundance and prosperity in many cultures such as China and India. It helps maintain a healthy lifestyle regimen and immune response and provides a spicy and delicious addition to cooking and baking.

Spruce. Spruce essential oil was also traditionally believed to possess the frequency of abundance. The Lakota Indians used it to enhance their ability to communicate with the world of Spirit. Spruce also assists the respiratory and nervous systems and can be used to relieve fatigued and achy muscles.

How to use Christmas Spirit™

  • Best way is to diffuse in a room or house, or add a few drops on Potpourri before gatherings or even during gatherings.
  • Apply a couple of drops over the heart, wrists or neck. Dilute with a vegetable oil when applying it topically (Note: Be mindful that Orange oil is photo-sensitive so if you are applying it topically be sure to cover your skin when going outdoors.)
  • Put a couple of drops on a wet cloth and put in the clothes dryer.
  • Add about 8 drops to tissue or cotton wool and place in vents.

Three (3) Wise Men™

3 Wise Men™ was formulated to open up the sub-conscious, promote feelings of reverence and enhance spiritual awareness. Its ingredients are:

Almond oil. A rich source of vitamin E and in ancient Ayurvedic medicine was regarded as a nutrient for the brain and nervous system.

Sandalwood. Very high in sesquiterpenes, those compounds that can help stimulate the pineal gland and limbic centre of the brain – the centre of emotions and memory. A useful oil to use in yoga and meditation. Much more on this essential oil, in my article Sandalwood essential oil – for Mind, Body and Spirit.

Juniper. Juniper also elevates spiritual awareness and creates feelings of love and peace. It has a sweet, earthy and woody aroma.

Frankincense. So much can be written about this essential oil. In short it’s probably the pre-eminent oil for spiritual activity and development. It was used an oil of anointing and in religious ceremonies for thousands of years. It too, like Sandalwood, stimulates the limbic area of the brain. Frankincense is also useful for massage and the maintenance of healthy skin. See my article on Frankincense for more information on this oil.

Spruce. See under Christmas Spirit™ above.

Myrrh. Like Frankincense, Myrrh is an essential oil heavily referenced in the Bible and has a high level of sesquiterpenes; hence a great oil for meditation or spiritual work. It was one of the gifts to the Christ child and can help us to open our hearts and minds. See my article on Myrrh for more information.

How to use 3 Wise Men™:

  • Apply 2 drops to the crown of the head or alternatively over the thymus or back of the neck. When applying rub in a clockwise manner to create an energy of opening (and ultimately receiving the gifts of spirit).
  • Like Christmas Spirit™ you can diffuse it in a room or add it to potpourri, as it has a beautiful, uplifting aroma or place on cotton wool in vents.
  • If used in massage, dilute 1:15 with a vegetable oil.
  • Wear as a cologne or perfume.

To all of you we extend our best wishes for the peace and blessings of Christmas.
May the festive season be a joyful time for you and your loved ones.
See you in 2016


Our Reading List

20150903_180847As promised in our last post, we have put up a page with Recommended reading on the subjects we cover in this blog.

It’s been a long time coming. We’ve put up book reviews on the blog in the past, but we’ve also been asked numerous times in the past what books we read. We get questions like “What books should I read on this subject?” or “Where’s the best place to do my own research?”.  So at the top of the page you will now see a tab – Recommended reading.

I’ve included links to any reviews we may have written on the books, as well as links to Abebooks so that readers can go straight to a site and purchase the book if it takes their fancy. Why did we choose Abebooks and not say Amazon? I’ve used Abebooks many times in the past to source hard to get books. They are essentially a network of bookshops and book distributors and include such heavies as Book Depository. Doing a search for a book, you will get a list of suppliers on the one page and I can order the results by lowest price and change the currency. So in effect it’s a site that allows you to compare the prices of different suppliers. Hence, when you click on the link for a particular book on our reading list, you will be taken straight to a results page where you can compare the price of different suppliers, and choose the one you want to buy from.

As we come across good material that we’ve read, we’ll add it to the list.

Till next time,



Compliance issues

Hi folks,

You will have noticed the paucity of postings and articles on this site (Last article was May 1st) this year. To cut to the chase, because of grumblings from the FDA in the U.S. vis-a-vis Young Living, there are strict limitations on what we can say about different essential oils. We cannot discuss which oils are beneficial to any given ailment or medical condition. According to Young Living, we are to focus on essential oils supporting good health and wellbeing, rather than sickness.

At present Young Living are in the process of laying out what can be said with respect to each of their products, so that they remain compliant with FDA guidelines. To make things even more complicated (from a blogger and distributor’s perspective), each market (Australia, New Zealand, Canada, etc) will have somewhat different guidelines. For example, Young Living have a number of oils that are classified as dietary supplements. In Australia YL essential oils are generally classified as fragrances, not dietary supplements. See what I mean?

As we’ve always used Young Living essential oils (and want to continue using them)we intend to honour Young Living’s request of its distributors. Unfortunately it means that until we get some more clarity on what we can tell you about these amazing oils, I’m not going to be posting too much information on essential oils. It’s just too complicated and risky at the moment. This also means we cannot field any kind of questions re: what oils to use for specific conditions.

I will be putting up at the earliest convenience, a list of reading materials you can go to and do your own research.

Hopefully we will be able to resume writing about the essential oils again in the near future.

Till Next time



Chakras: ‘New Age’ or Old? (re-visited)

LatChakrase last year I received a comment from a reader (Sarah) in response to a post I put up on the subject of Chakras – Are Chakras ‘New Age’ or old? The post was actually a re-print of an article by Dr David Stewart (Raindrop Messenger). This was what Sarah had to say:

You outta be ashamed of yourselves! Chakras ARE promoting NEW AGE. Your article in which you say Chakras are biblical is so OUT OF CONTEXT of biblical exegesis that it is almost unbelievable. If you wanna do what you are doing, which is delving in the New Age, then fine, but don’t twist scripture and call it Christian. All you are doing is leading people astray. You are a false teacher [a wolf in sheep’s clothing] I pray The Lord convicts you!

Initially I gave this comment short shrift, but since then I’ve given her remarks some thought and the following post is what I probably should have written to her. I know some of my readers would probably say, “why bother?” Fair point, as I suspect the following would probably not convince Sarah. However what I penned may clarify a few concepts and ideas for other people, so for what it’s worth here it is:

Dear Sarah,
the label “New Age” is one of the most bandied around in the last 50-60 years. Initially it was probably directed at elements of the 60’s and 70’s counter-culture, but by the 80’s it became a label given to almost anything that’s strange or out of the ‘normal’. You have subjects as diverse as reincarnation, channeling, meditation, Wicca, environmentalism, UFOs, homeopathy, crystals, herbal medicine and even essential oils, being thrown into the one mish-mash. But what do UFOs have to do with herbal medicine? Or crystals with environmentalism? And when we come down to it, what’s ‘new’ about many of these subjects? Let’s use chakras as an example, seeing that you insist they ARE New Age.

The word Chakra is Sanskrit for ‘wheel’. There are references to the chakras in the Hindu Vedas which go back at least 4,000 years. Hardly new. And nor is this just a Hindu idea or doctrine. In his landmark study of the Ancient Egyptian temple of Luxor (The Temple of Man), the French scholar R A Schwaller de Lubicz, was able to convincingly show that the Egyptians knew of and understood the functioning of the human chakra system. And much, if not all, of Ancient Egypt,s knowledge was passed on to the Greeks. And if the Ancient Egyptians knew of it, you can bet your bottom dollar, the Hebrews would have learned of it. Hardly ‘new’ is it?

You claim that I (and Dr Stewart) are twisting scripture and calling chakras Christian. I’m sorry if we gave you this impression. This wasn’t the intention. What Dr Stewart was trying to demonstrate (and what I’ve just highlighted above) is that the Chakras are referred to in all the major cultures of the world, going back thousands of years. Including the Christian and Judaic scriptures. Dr Stewart even pointed out that one of the oldest Christian churchs – the Eastern Orthodox – are aware of and understand chakras.

The Old and New Testaments are full of symbology. Dr Stewart gave the example of the Jewish menorah of seven candles, symbolising the seven chakras. He also quoted the Book of Revelations (1:10-15) “I was in the Spirit on the Lord’s day and heard behind me a great voice, as of a trumpet . . . And I turned to see . . . and being turned, I saw seven golden candlesticks; And in the midst of the seven candlesticks one like unto the Son of man . . .and his voice as the sound of many waters.”

You appear to speak as if you are some authority on the scriptures. Perhaps you are. But you are by no means the only human who has extensively studied the bible. Dr David Stewart, in addition to having qualifications in science and biology, studied theology and philosophy at Central Methodist College in Fayette, Missouri…and was a pastor in Missouri. I’ve had the pleasure of meeting Dr Stewart once when he came to Australia and have corresponded with him on occasions. He is a person of good character. In fact I found him to be a very decent, kind and humble person. He’s certainly not some con-man (or “false teacher” as you would refer to him).

If you wish to disagree with another person’s interpretation of scripture, that’s fine Sarah; but please spare us your sanctimonious and self-righteous language. As for your last sentence where you “pray The Lord convicts” me. Convicts me?? Say what? I wasn’t aware God did such a thing. Humans convict other humans Sarah – humans.


Till next time



Essential oil ideas for Valentine’s Day

With Valentine’s Day approaching I thought I might share some ideas I’ve come across, for scents that could help make for a great occasion. I’ve stopped using after-shaves for some time and now only use essential oils. With so many great essential oils and oil blends who needs Calvin Klein, Lagerfeld, Chanel or Estee Lauder; especially when you consider that a lot of these big names use synthetics that aren’t that great for you.
ylang ylang

Ylang ylang trees on the Young Living farm in Ecuador. Imagine the aroma from 240,000 ylang ylang trees.

Ylang ylang (Cananga odorata)

One essential oil that I’ve been using lately as an after-shave alternative is Ylang ylang. It smells great and both guys and gals can use it. It has so many great qualities from both a physical and emotional level.
It’s uplifting, relaxing, promotes confidence and is said to balance male and female energies.  It has a reputation as an aphrodisiac and in Indonesia, the marriage bed is sprinkled with ylang ylang flowers on the wedding night. On a physical level it has properties that can assist with high blood pressure. I usually apply a few drops on either the wrists, neck or even chest area around the heart. However you could also diffuse it in your living area or bedroom, or alternatively incorporate it into a massage, by adding it to a carrier oil (Almond oil, jojoba, etc). Ylang ylang’s other properties are: antidepressant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, vasodilating and sedative
Blend Classification: Personifier and Modifier
Blends with: Anise, bergamot, cardamom, chamomile, cumin, geranium, grapefruit, lemon, marjoram, sandalwood and vetiver.
Odor: Type: Middle to Base Notes (20-80% of the blend); Scent: Sweet, heavy, cloying, tropical floral with spicy balsamic undertones.
Safety data: Use sparingly if you suffer low blood pressure.
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Shutran is an essential oil blend that was especially created by Gary to be used like a cologne (although without the synthetics in it). And although it was designed for men to boost feelings of masculinity and confidence, its aroma is appealing to both men and women. It includes the exclusive-to-Young-Living Idaho Blue Spruce (Picea pungens), a refreshing, invigorating essential oil to both body and mind. Also in the blend is ocotea (Ocotea quixos), hinoki  (Chamaecyparis obtusa), davana (Artemisia pallens), cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), lemon (Citrus limon), lavender (Lavendula angustifolia) and ylang ylang (Cananga odorata). If applying on your skin avoid direct sunlight for up to 12 hours after.

Blends you can make up

The following are a couple of great ideas that were posted on the Young Living blog

Tyler’s “Blue Collar Meets White Collar” after-shave.

Has a masculine yet gentle aroma, that you can apply after shaving or before bed to moisturize the skin overnight. For this blend use the following:

  • 6 drops of Royal Hawaiian Sandalwood (Santalum paniculatum)
  • 4 drops of Myrrh (Commiphora myrrha)
  • 3 drops of Mister™, Hong Kuai or Hinoki10 drops of V-6™ vegetable oil
  • 10 drops of witch hazel extract

Make sure you use darkened glass bottle to store your blend

Tyler’s “Perfume for Her” for a light, sweet and long-lasting perfume. For this blend use: 

  • 15 Drops of a citrus essential oil like Bergamot
  • 3 drops of either ylang ylang, lavender, clary sage or geranium
  • 2 drops of a secondary floral oils from those listed above.

If the aroma is too strong add a few drops of V-6™ vegetable oil . If you prefer it stronger, add an extra drop of oil (or as needed) of the two floral oils.

Hope you have a lovely Valentines

Till next time



Disclaimer: Please remember that anything discussed here does not
constitute medical advice and cannot substitute for appropriate medical care. Where essential oils are mentioned, it’s recommended you use only pure, unadulterated therapeutic grade essential oils and follow the safety directions of the manufacturer.

Further reading:
Using essential oils in your love life, Wellbeing,  30th January 2013
Using essential oils in your love life: Part 2, Wellbeing, 7th February 2013.
Essential oils vs perfumes, Essential Oils For Living, 14th February 2013
Complete Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Handbook for Everyday Wellness
At 480 pages, Nerys Purchon and Lora Cantele’s book is packed with useful information. Whether you’re a novice to essential oils or a seasoned user, you will find plenty of useful tips and information in their book. And best of all, the material is written in a down to earth, lay-person’s language.

The book is divided into 4 sections:

  • Part One (The oils) looks at the properties of essential oils, some key essential oils, an A-Z listing of essential oils (109 different oils), fixed and carrier oils, basic massage oil blends and infused oils.
  • Part Two (just over 200 pages) covers different conditions and essential oil remedies for them; from abrasions to workplace stress (450 different remedies)
  • Part Three covers essential oils for daily living – such as personal care (skin, hair and body), the home and massage. In this section you’ll find specific recipes for things like soap, shampoos, conditioners and even colognes.
  • Part Four (Practicalities) – equipment, measuring and storing essential oils. It also includes a glossary, list of resources, bibliography and index.

What I particularly liked in the format of the book were the brief tips and cautions included on the page margins, as well as highlighted information in text boxes through out the book. E.g. Citrus oils and Phototoxicity, and Mineral Oil and Petroleum Jelly.

The book is called The Complete Aromatherapy and Essential Oils Handbook for good reason, as in fact it seems like there isn’t an aspect of aromatherapy that doesn’t get covered or explained in this book. I particularly liked how the authors discussed the uses and benefits of different carrier oils, such as almond, apricot kernel, avocado, borage seed, carrot seed, cocoa butter, coconut, evening primrose, grapeseed, jojoba wax, kukui nut, macadamia, meadowfoam, neem, olive, peanut, rosehip seed, safflower, sesame, shea butter, sunflower, tamanu, vitamin e and wheat germ oil. There is also a discussion of hydrolats (which are distilled plant waters), floral waters and infused oils (the soaking of a plant’s leaves, stem or flowers in a carrier oil for a long period of time).

My only point of difference with the authors is their caution over the internal use/ingestion of essential oils, which is something very much consistent with English-American schools of aromatherapy. [1]  I have used a number of essential oils internally over the past 10 years without ill effect. Ultimately this is something for each reader to decide for themselves in consultation with their health care practitioner. One could say that it’s better to “err on the side of caution”. It certainly doesn’t take away from the enormous value you will find in this book. Here’s an example from their book, of a great bath oil blend you can make up to wind down after a stressful day:

Relaxing bath oil blend:

1 tsp (5 ml)    grapeseed or sweet almond oil
     2 drops     Roman chamomile essential oil
     2 drops     Lavender essential oil
     2 drops     Ylang ylang essential oil
Fill your tub with warm water. In a small non-reactive bowl, combine grapeseed oil and chamomile, lavender and ylang ylang essential oils. Stir well and then add to tub. Agitate the water thoroughly to disperse the oils, then soak yourself in the tub for 30 minutes, massaging into your skin any floating droplets of oil.

Buy the book

The Authors: 

Nerys Purchon was one of Australia’s leading experts on herbs, aromatherapy and essential oils. Her books have sold more than 300,000 copies worldwide. (Nerys Purchon passed away on January 15th 2011.)

Lora Cantele, RA, CMAIA, AAS is a registered aromatherapist, clinical aromatologist, certified Swiss reflex therapist and aromatherapy educator and writer.

Till next time


Disclaimer: Please remember that anything discussed here does not
constitute medical advice and cannot substitute for appropriate medical care. Where essential oils are mentioned, it’s recommended you use only pure, unadulterated therapeutic grade essential oils and follow the safety directions of the manufacturer.


Brain power oilTwo weeks ago I talked about (Essential oils that help your brain) a number of essential oils that have been shown by research to be beneficial to our brain and in particular our cognitive abilities. It would be remiss of me to not mention a number of oil blends and oil based supplements that could also benefit people. Essential oil blends are great in that you can combine a number of different but complementary essential oils, such that the resulting blend is greater than the “sum of the parts”. You basically amplify the effects that you would get using a single oil.

Brain Power™

Brain Power™ contains the oils: Blue cypress (Callitris intratropica), cedarwood (Cedrus atlantica), frankincense (Boswellia carteri), helichrysum (Helichrysum italicum), lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), melissa
(Melissa officinalis) and sandalwood (Santalum album). It was formulated to help give your brain a boost with essential oils that are high in sesquiterpenes. Of the oils included, Cedarwood has the highest
concentration of oxygenating sesquiterpenes. No other essential oil exceeds it. It’s followed closely by melissa, then sandalwood and blue cypress, with frankincense coming in fourth. Why is this so important?
For memory retention and recall, the brain has to have oxygen coming to it. You also have helichrysum in this blend because of its chelating capacity. What is that you say? It will help clear the brain of any chemicals and heavy metals such as lead and mercury, and open the blood vessels up so that the oxygen can get through. Melissa is calming and uplifting. Frankincense is an oil that has been used to battle depression, while lavender is an oil that’s been documented to improve concentration and mental acuity.

Read the rest of this entry

Essential oils that support your brain

The hippocampus regulates the function of memory.

The hippocampus regulates the function of memory.

So much of our daily lives and quality of life relies on the health of our mental faculties. And yet we are plagued on one end by mental fatigue, poor concentration and burn-out and on the other with long-term degenerative diseases such as Alzheimers and Dementia. Good news is that we can do something about it. Scientific research suggests there are a number of essential oils that can benefit our cognitive abilities and help us to maintain healthy brains. One lecturer in early childhood and special education studies, Professor Barbara Wilmes, has even gone as far as to suggest that educators should be using essential oils to boost learning in our classrooms. [1]

Thyme essential oil (Thymus vulgaris)

One of the primary structural components of the brain is a fat known as DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid). DHA belongs to the Omega 3 group of fatty acids and is largely derived from fish oils. So yes, keep using the fish oil. Of the Omega 3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA are the most important to our brain and overall health. Did you know that Thyme essential oil has been shown in research to dramatically slow down the degeneration of DHA in the brain?

In a study carried out in 2000, laboratory rats were fed a daily dose of thyme oil (42.5 mg/K of body weight over the course of their lifetime (around 28 months). When the data was analyzed it was found that DHA levels in the 28 month old rat brains was the same as that of 7 month old rats. Putting this in human terms, it would be the equivalent of an 80 year old having the brain chemistry of a 20 year old. [2]

Read more…

Joseph Stiglitz

Prof Joseph Stiglitz

On Tuesday night (July 8) I attended the lecture of the Nobel-prize winning economist, Professor Joseph Stiglitz. The central theme of his lecture was not only the cost to human society from the growth in inequality, but that rather than being caused by economic factors, this was largely the result of deliberate policy and politics.

The prize for the highest inequality in the world went to surprise, surprise – the United States. In the last 30 years (Since the Reagan administration actually) the share of income to the top 1% is nearly one quarter all U.S. income. And Australia is experiencing a similar trend.

It’s often argued that if we allow for the “trickle down” effect, part of the wealth from the top 1% will trickle down to the bulk of the population. But according to Stiglitz, the trickledown theory simply hasn’t worked. Median income hasn’t grown in the U.S. Today it’s lower than 40 years ago. The average American worker is struggling to just keep up with what their parents were earning. And NO it’s not because we haven’t been productive. Productivity hasn’t stagnated over the last 30 years. It’s steadily grown. What we are seeing is in fact a growing gap between productivity and wages.

In the U.S., the rewards of increased productivity haven’t been shared amongst the bulk of the working population. In Australia, while the average wage has kept pace with economic growth, the minimum wage has fallen behind, as have unemployment benefits and most government pensions. In the U.S. 95% of the increase in incomes since the GFC has gone to the top 1%. One family in America, the Waltons (who founded Walmart), have more wealth than the bottom 30-40% of Americans. In Australia, the richest seven people hold more wealth than the bottom 20 percent of the population (Close to 2 million people).

America has traditionally been seen as the “Land of opportunity”, but as Stiglitz points out, even in terms equality of opportunity, America ranks the worst. Australia apparently does much better because of its education system.

The Price of inequality
Even the IMF acknowledges that inequality ultimately weakens our economies. Ultimately income inequality impacts on all aspects of people’s quality of life: life expectancy, access to education, opportunities for upward mobility and even access to the political process. The last factor is most evident in the amounts of money that are used to lobby politicians, especially when you consider the billions that were spent on the last U.S. presidential campaign. If you think about it, diminished access to the political process (or think of it as political inequality) is probably the most serious impact from income inequality. If our political representatives have been ‘bought’ our hopes of effecting changes in our society are greatly diminished. We are in effect losing our democracy.

The Causes
And as to the causes of this inequality Stiglitz puts the blame largely on the policies and politics that are at play in Western countries. Stiglitz made reference to Australia’s current political leadership’s desire to emulate the U.S. He singled out the charge on visits to the doctor. The Abbott government also wants to change indexation arrangements for pensions and social security payments. This will mean pensions and other payments will fall further behind.

What about all that debt that the U.S. and Europe hold? Surely that’s an impediment to economic growth and makes government spending cuts necessary. Interestingly, U.S. debt after the 2nd World War was 130% of the GDP and yet the most rapid growth in the U.S. economy came in the period after the war.

What should be done
So what were Joseph Stiglitz’s suggestions, at least for Australia? Firstly that Australia (and other nations) needed to stop emulating the U.S. and protect their education and health systems. We need to stop selling our resources so cheaply. Stiglitz made the comparison between Australia and Norway, which has managed to build a substantial national wealth fund from its oil resources over the years. It was suggested we auction our mineral resources in the same manner we auctioned the electromagnetic spectrum to the communications providers. We also need to tax multinationals like Google and Amazon on the basis of their sales, capital invested and activity here. And governments need to discourage rent-seeking and monopoly activities and encourage full employment.

You can view the video recording of Stiglitz’s lecture at the Sydney Town Hall from here, and his appearance on ABC’s Q and A. Also check out these articles in the newspapers:

Joseph Stiglitz packs out Sydney Town Hall

Joseph Stiglitz warns on ‘free’ trade deals

In addition, the Australia Institute has released its own paper on inequality in Australia: Income and Wealth Inequality in Australia. It highlights the fact that the top 20% of people have 5 times more income than the bottom 20% and hold 71 times more wealth.
Till next time

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