Book and Site Reviews Archives

Book Review: Cancel the Apocalypse

CancelTheApocalypseYou could be forgiven for thinking that there is a dearth of good ideas and alternative thinking, to deal with the social, economic and environmental woes of the world. Only just recently I read how students in Economics at the University of Manchester were in a state of near rebellion, demanding that alternatives to free-market economics be also taught and discussed. On top of this the mainstream media (papers, TV and radio) are almost entirely dominated by large corporate interests. It’s little wonder we get few alternatives to the status quo.

But folks the good ideas and alternatives are definitely out there. A year ago, I reviewed Richard Murphy’s fabulous book The Courageous State. Now just recently I finished reading a book by Andrew Simms – Cancel the Apocalypse. Great title eh?

In essence, Andrew’s book is a response to the doom and gloom – how we can and MUST cancel the apocalypse. This is a book packed full of ‘ammunition’ against the basic ideas and concepts of neoliberal and free-market thinking as well as materialism. In parts I found it a little too drawn out and found myself saying “Ok Andrew, I get your point. Now can we move on?” I think he could have made the chapters smaller and divided it into meaningful sub-sections. But overall I think it’s well thought out and argued. I initially read a public library copy of this book, but I thought this book was so useful and important, that I should have my own copy. This is a book I will want to refer back to again and again. It’s also packed full of great references and leads to other works and research.

Here’s a taste of some of the things covered in the book:

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Releasing emotional patterns with eoBelieve it or not, our emotions have a big impact on physical health and wellbeing. The famous neuroscientist, Candice Pert once said “”repressed traumas caused by overwhelming emotion can be stored in a body part, thereafter affecting our ability to feel that part or even move it”.

What essentially happens is that the moment we have a terrible experience, our brain (the limbic centre specifically) chooses a place to store that memory for future reference until it can be dealt with. Not unlike a librarian filing a book in a collection for future use really, though in this instance it’s one heavy duty library we are talking about. Because many of the traumas we carry, go back to our childhood, infancy and even in the womb. And unless we identify these traumas or emotional patterns, they manifest through out our lives as lingering problems that impact on our capacity to experience our lives to their fullest potential.

So how do we identify these emotional patterns and then deal with them? This is where Dr Carolyn Mein’s book Releasing emotional patterns with essential oils comes in. Why essential oils? Essential oils have the capacity to interact directly with stored emotional patterns in the human body, through the sense of smell (the olfactory sense carries information directly to the limbic centre in the brain – where many emotions are stored) and through the human energy field (remember, essential oils have a frequency – see my article What’s your frequency? for more on this topic).

Carolyn Mein outlines 5 steps to releasing emotional patterns:

1. Identifying the pattern that is linked to the emotion
2. Understanding the pattern – the opposite side of the emotion
3. learning the lesson by discovering the way out of the situation
4. clearing and reprogramming the pattern in the body’s cellular memory – changing the DNA
5. releasing the pattern from the memory held in the limbic system of the brain.

Essential oils play a key role in the last 5 steps. Using essential oils directly on acupuncture alarm points sends the oil’s frequency directly to the organ or tissue affected – clearing the pattern from the cellular memory – while smelling the oil releases the memory held in the limbic centre of the brain.

Carolyn’s book has some amazing tables in it. One table links parts of the body with specific emotions and the essential oil that will help. There are tables that work from the other angles as well, e.g. what emotions  and acupuncture alarm points are associated with a specific essential oil. The book also contains extensive body and facial charts showing the various acupuncture alarm points.

To use a well worn phrase, “but wait there’s more”. Also covered in the book:

* Muscle testing and how to do it (with photos and diagrams)
* The core emotional issues identified with each body part
* Your dominant traits and body type traits
* Writing techniques for releasing buried emotions

People have asked me for the definitive book on using essential oils for working with emotions. Carolyn Mein’s book would have to be at the top.

Buy the book

Till next time

Cheers
Anthony

Aromatherapy Handbook for beauty, hair and skin care
Those of you who like me are concerned about the less than natural content in our personal care products (hair, skin care, toiletries, etc) will find this book of great value.
Erich Keller starts by describing the history and essence of modern day cosmetics and moves on to talk about what was the original source of cosmetics – essential oils.
So much of what we use today is not only denuded of therapeutic grade essential oils, but replaced with synthetics that can harm us.
Keller’s book gives people an alternative to this.
You’ll find:
  • information on the key ingredients found in natural cosmetics.
  • dealing with different skin types and hair types
  • recipes for skin care, aromatic baths, hair care and natural perfumes.
The format of the book makes it easy to use and refer back to.
All in all you’ll get great benefits from this book if you’re the kind of person interested in making their own grooming products.

Buy the book

Till next time
Cheers
Anthony

Book review: The Courageous State

In this article we return to the theme of the “healthy society” that I first wrote about in April this year. At the same time it’s also a review of a book and a website.
For the past year, I’ve been following the blog posts of Richard Murphy on Tax Research UK and just recently I finished reading his book The Courageous State. For me this book and his posts have been (and continue to be) a real eye-opener. I’ve left the info on Richard to the very end as I want to focus on his website and book. First, let me talk about his website: Tax Research UK

Tax Research UK
This website has now been ranked as the No 1 economics blog in the U.K.. Please don’t be put off by the words “economics” and “tax research”. There’s a very good reason this site was ranked No 1. Richard’s posts are less about economic theory and more about action.
The key theme in his posts are that governments have more than enough money to look after the needs of their people; that the key problem is that the wealthiest corporations and individuals on the planet are using the world’s financial and taxation systems to their own advantage and paying little or no tax. This is having a deleterious  effect on the finances of many nations and ultimately the livelihoods of millions of people. For example, in the European Union the tax gap (the gap between what is owed in taxes and what is actually paid) is estimated to be about €1 trillion.[1] When you consider that governments in Europe are forcing their populations to go through austerity measures, this is crazy stuff folks. In the U.K. the tax gap is estimated to be £120 billion.[2] And there likewise the Cameron government has imposed austerity measures and cut-back extensively on the public sector.

It’s issues such as this that Richard Murphy tackles in his daily posts. Many of his posts are like ‘cruise missiles’ aimed straight at the politicians, authorities and key figures in the financial sector. And he is clearly making himself heard in Britain and around the world, with a recent member’s bill (Michael Meacher) being introduced into Parliament – written by Richard Murphy – and aimed at curbing massive tax avoidance. The accounting concept of country-by-country reporting, aimed at creating more transparency in the financial affairs of multi-national corporations, was created by Richard Murphy. This concept is presently being considered by the E.U., the OECD and International Accounting Standards board among others.

Here is a taste of some of his writing:

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The One Gift

Just recently I finished reading this marvellous book – The One Gift – Gary Young’s first novel.

The story is set in the Arabian peninsula around 3000 years ago at the time of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. It highlights the frankincense,  myrrh and precious spice trade as it existed back then; while the story itself revolves around Shutran, a merchant and caravan commander, and his family.
Shutran and the men working with him must transport the precious frankincense through some of the most difficult terrain in the world, and in the novel, you get a great sense of the dangers involved: giant sandstorms, desert bandits, pirates, black scorpions and worst of all – treachery. So there’s plenty of adventure and action in this story.
But I felt that this was so much more than just a great adventure story – there’s a lot of heart and wisdom in it too. Shutran is a true leader, a man of honour and integrity, respected and even loved by the men under his command. So much so, that he wins the respect of kings and queens. I reckon there is a lot that modern leaders could learn from him. And Shutran it turns out is also a great father and husband.
It’s also a very spiritual novel and we see in many instances how Shutran uses his intuition and his faith in the spirit to get him and his men through many a danger.
The novel has some great illustrations, but best of all I loved the large map of the Arabian peninsula that you get with the book. I think it’s a well researched novel. In fact I get the feeling from reading The One Gift, that this might have been a past life for Gary Young. Who knows?
In past posts, I’ve talked about the value placed in Frankincense by the Ancients. I think The One Gift does a great job of conveying the value the ancient people placed in this spice and how civilizations were shaped around this amazing tree and its resin (See our previous posts: Frankincense: Treasure for the ancient world, hope for the modern, Part One and Two ).
Till next time,
Cheers
Anthony

Evernote Essentials

Ok, so what am I doing reviewing a book on a web application, you might ask? People have been asking me what I use to write my posts and articles on the website. My answer is Evernote.  I find Evernote to be probably one of the most useful applications on the web for storing articles, research, clippings, photos, documents, you name it.   I basically use Evernote to store articles and files that come in handy for research – and that includes essential oils and health related topics. However you can use it to load all kinds of stuff. Lately I been using it to store and display our holiday photos. Aside from just storing Everrnote helps you organise it, so you can later find it.

Anyway for those of you interested in this useful application, I came across this book by Brett Kelly – Evernote Essentials

It’s only 84 pages long and it’s aimed at both beginner and advanced user.

It covers things like :

  • how to tag effectively, set up email filters
  • using Evernote as a task management system
  • photo sharing
  • Evernote for bloggers
  • Evernote with e-mail
  • Evernote as an address book
  • Evernote as a filing cabinet
  • even Evernote for Foodies.

If you really want to get the best out of this cloud computing application, then this is a book you’ll want to check out. The book costs $25 but I think for what you get it’s value for money. For more info check out Brett Kelly’s site.

Anthony

Click here to visit Brett Kelly

To see an example of an Evernote notebook, check out some of our holiday photos or if you want to create a movie journal.

Evernote Essentials book – Click here to visit Brett Kelly

 

 

 

 

Slow Death By Rubber Duck

 

Slow death by Rubber Duck: How the toxic chemistry of everyday life affects our health

Rick Smith and Bruce Lourie are two of Canada’s leading environmentalists, who decided to use their own homes and bodies as a laboratory. Ingesting, inhaling and applying topically all the things we find in our day to day environment, they examined everything from food, shampoos and deodorants to furniture and clothing. This book is the result of this research and the findings should alarm us all. This is a must read book if you are concerned about your health and that of your loved ones. Down below you will find a short TV interview. Check it out.

 

Buy the book