Essential oils that support your brain

The hippocampus regulates the function of memory.

The hippocampus regulates the function of memory.

So much of our daily lives and quality of life relies on the health of our mental faculties. And yet we are plagued on one end by mental fatigue, poor concentration and burn-out and on the other with long-term degenerative diseases such as Alzheimers and Dementia. Good news is that we can do something about it. Scientific research suggests there are a number of essential oils that can benefit our cognitive abilities and help us to maintain healthy brains. One lecturer in early childhood and special education studies, Professor Barbara Wilmes, has even gone as far as to suggest that educators should be using essential oils to boost learning in our classrooms. [1]

Thyme essential oil (Thymus vulgaris)

One of the primary structural components of the brain is a fat known as DHA (Docosahexaenoic acid). DHA belongs to the Omega 3 group of fatty acids and is largely derived from fish oils. So yes, keep using the fish oil. Of the Omega 3 fatty acids, DHA and EPA are the most important to our brain and overall health. Did you know that Thyme essential oil has been shown in research to dramatically slow down the degeneration of DHA in the brain?

In a study carried out in 2000, laboratory rats were fed a daily dose of thyme oil (42.5 mg/K of body weight over the course of their lifetime (around 28 months). When the data was analyzed it was found that DHA levels in the 28 month old rat brains was the same as that of 7 month old rats. Putting this in human terms, it would be the equivalent of an 80 year old having the brain chemistry of a 20 year old. [2]

Read more…

Oils of Ancient ScripturesThis is a compilation of 3 blogs I did recently on Wellbeing, in a series entitled Ancient Medicine (part one, two and three). I discussed 12 oils in totals: Sandalwood, Cassia, Cedarwood, Cypress, Frankincense, Galbanum, Hyssop, Myrrh, Myrtle, Onycha, Cistus/Rose of Sharon and Spikenard. All twelve of these are referenced in the Bible (Old and/or New Testaments). What I have added here are people’s testimonials on how they used these oils, so check them out. All these oils are available in one kit of 12 5ml bottles, as well as an audio tape (see the image to the left). To order a kit, visit our site. You will need to create an account, so just click on Join Now. Contact us if you have any questions.

Cheers
Anthony
Sandalwood (Santalum album)
Sandalwood (also known as Aloes) has been used in Ayurvedic medicine for thousands of years to revitalise the skin and for meditation and yoga. It was also used by the ancient Egyptians in the embalming process. Its properties include anti-tumoral, anti-viral and a stimulant to the immune system. Research has been documented showing its ability to inhibit numerous types of cancer cells and viruses, including the papilloma virus and herpes zoster.”And there came also Nicodemus, which at the first came to Jesus by night, and brought a mixture of myrrh and aloes, about a hundred pound weight” – John 19:39(See also sandalwood under 15 essential oils for stress relief and Essential oils for the spirit).
Some uses:

  • To enhance sleep, place a drop in your hands and rub them together, then place them over your nose and inhale deeply.
  • Use as a cologne or after-shave. Combine it with a carrier oil, such as almond oil, if desired.
  • For cold sores, apply one drop on the cold sore as soon as it appears and repeat this 5 times a day.
  • Massage into the scalp to retard greying of the hair.
  • Place a drop on cuts to speed up healing.
  • Rub a drop above the eyebrows in a circle around the eye 1-3 times a day, to improve healing.
  • Use a couple of drops for dry, chapped skin. You can combine with a carrier oil such as almond or jojoba.
  • Add 5-6 drops to running water in a bath tub for a relaxing bath.

Check out other people’s experiences in these Testimonials

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Dried wolfberries. Delicious but also nutritious. Photo from wstefano, Wikimedia Commons

In our last post, I included some testimonials showing how different people had benefited from drinking Ningxia Red. Gary Young, has also incorporated the wolfberry into numerous nutritional supplements and meal replacement formulae.

Ningxia wolfberries are also found in these other nutritional products:

Balance Complete™ Vanilla Cream Meal  Replacement

This is quite yummy. I have it for breakfast in the mornings (alternate it with powermeal – see below). You can make some great shakes with it. We typically add fruit like apples, bananas, strawberries and blueberries (when in season) as well as Ningxia Red juice and some coconut milk. Occasionally I will add an egg to it as well. It keeps me going till about lunch-time. If you find you’re still feeling hungry, add an extra scoop or add an egg. Balance Complete is high in fiber and protein, along with good fats, enzymes, vitamins and minerals.  It’s designed to be a powerful energizer, immune system booster and cleanser.
Along with the high antioxidant benefits from Ningxia wolfberry powder you’re getting these healthy ingredients:
brown rice bran, barley grass, aloe vera, cinnamon powder and a whey protein blend.

Read other people’s testimonials

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The One Gift

Just recently I finished reading this marvellous book – The One Gift – Gary Young’s first novel.

The story is set in the Arabian peninsula around 3000 years ago at the time of King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. It highlights the frankincense,  myrrh and precious spice trade as it existed back then; while the story itself revolves around Shutran, a merchant and caravan commander, and his family.
Shutran and the men working with him must transport the precious frankincense through some of the most difficult terrain in the world, and in the novel, you get a great sense of the dangers involved: giant sandstorms, desert bandits, pirates, black scorpions and worst of all – treachery. So there’s plenty of adventure and action in this story.
But I felt that this was so much more than just a great adventure story – there’s a lot of heart and wisdom in it too. Shutran is a true leader, a man of honour and integrity, respected and even loved by the men under his command. So much so, that he wins the respect of kings and queens. I reckon there is a lot that modern leaders could learn from him. And Shutran it turns out is also a great father and husband.
It’s also a very spiritual novel and we see in many instances how Shutran uses his intuition and his faith in the spirit to get him and his men through many a danger.
The novel has some great illustrations, but best of all I loved the large map of the Arabian peninsula that you get with the book. I think it’s a well researched novel. In fact I get the feeling from reading The One Gift, that this might have been a past life for Gary Young. Who knows?
In past posts, I’ve talked about the value placed in Frankincense by the Ancients. I think The One Gift does a great job of conveying the value the ancient people placed in this spice and how civilizations were shaped around this amazing tree and its resin (See our previous posts: Frankincense: Treasure for the ancient world, hope for the modern, Part One and Two ).
Till next time,
Cheers
Anthony

Dealing with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

 

Just recently I read [1] that Young Living had partnered with Donna Karan’s Urban Zen Integrative Therapy programme (UZIT) [2] , by donating essential oils to soldiers suffering with post-traumatic stress disorder. In June this year, The UZIT programme launched Operation Warrior Wellness, with the co-operation of the U.S. military, to research how soldiers would react to integrative therapy which includes meditation, yoga, Reiki and the use of Young Living Essential Oils. The programme’s goal is to study how natural therapies can provide soldiers with the tools to reduce stress, anxiety and increase relaxation. The article in question didn’t reveal what oils Young Living had given towards the project, but I can imagine that when the results of the study are in we’ll get more information.

In the meantime, I thought this might be a good opportunity to discuss what essential oils might be beneficial to sufferers of PTSD. PTSD is commonly thought of as a returned soldier’s affliction. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case. Not that I wish this on anyone, but there is a good chance that at some point in our lives we will encounter someone close to us (or maybe even ourselves), that is suffering this disorder. PTSD affects not just those exposed to a war zone, but also people involved in natural disasters or violent crimes – both rescue workers and victims – adults and children. Before we look at ways to help people, let’s look at what exactly PTSD is and what some of the symptoms are.
PTSD and its symptoms
PTSD is essentially an anxiety disorder that some people get after seeing or living through a dangerous event. [3] Normally humans experience the “fight or flight” response when there is some danger or the risk of harm. This is a healthy response. But in people who suffer PTSD, this reaction doesn’t function properly. They remain in a state of fear or anxiety even when the danger has long passed.
So what are the symptoms that someone is suffering PTSD?
  • They may re-experience symptoms such as flashbacks or bad dreams
  • Avoidance. This includes: staying away from places or objects that remind them of the bad experience, emotional numbness and even difficulty in remembering  the bad experience.
  • Hyperarousal symptoms including: being easily startled, feeling tense or edgy, having angry outbursts or difficulty sleeping.

Essential oils of Ecuador – Palo Santo

Welcome back !!! And a Happy New Year to you all.

We have a lot of great information to share with you in the coming weeks. We mentioned in our last post, that Gary Young had given a conference call covering topics such as cancer, hormonal inbalances and yeast infections. More recently he gave a conference call talking about Palo Santo and the blend RutaVala.

Palo Santo (Bursera graveolens) and Ruta (Ruta graveolens), one of the constituent oils of Rutavala, are both harvested and distilled in Ecuador. So we thought this would be a great opportunity for us to introduce you to the essential oils of Ecuador.

Bursera graveolens

The Frankincense of Ecuador

Palo Santo (which means “Holy Wood”) has many similarities to Frankincense and is used in a similar fashion by the peoples of Ecuador and Peru. Like Frankincense it’s considered a spiritual oil, and the locals use it to drive away negative energies.

Its constituents are similar but Palo Santo has a much higher level of limonene (55-65%), and is high in 1.8 Cineole and Carvacrol. What does that mean for you and me? Palo Santo has anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumoral and immune-stimulating qualities.

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Essential oils for pregnancy – stretchmarks

After our short article on essential oils for pregnancy several weeks ago,  a number of questions were raised by some readers and so this article is a follow up.  Are stretch marks from pregnancy a concern for you? Or perhaps you’re concerned that you may have to undergo an episiotomy after delivery? Well essential oils can and have helped women with these problems. Today I’m going to talk about  about two remarkable essential oil based products known as ClaraDerm and TenderTush.

ClaraDerm is made up of the essential oils of Myrrh, Melaleuca Alternifolia (Tea Tree), Lavender, Frankincense, Roman Chamomile and Helichrysum in a base of fractionated coconut oil. Gary Young developed this blend for his wife, Mary, who was expecting at the time. She sprayed it around her vaginal area after each elimination, for up to two months before she had her baby.

Mary also rubbed on TenderTush (also created by Gary for her) on her tummy. Tender Tush ointment consists of Virgin coconut oil, cocoa butter, pure bees wax, Wheat germ oil, Organic olive oil,  Almond oil and the essential oils: Sandalwood, Rosewood, Roman Chamomile, Lavender, Cistus, Blue Tansy, Lemon, and Frankincense.

The end result was that Mary had no stretch marks and no need for an episiotomy.

ClaraDerm is also fantastic for skin irritations, rashes and yeast infections such as Candida.

The following are some of the testimonials I found for ClaraDerm. If you click on the link it will take you directly to their testimonial. In the first example you may contact them if you have any questions.

ClaraDerm Spray after childbirth
Nancy Ziganti (may be contacted if you have any questions – Gavina)
Parma, OH, United States

I have two daughters who have each recently gone through childbirth. They
each delivered
without any medication, but unfortunately each required an episiotomy.

I watched the doctors stitch them afterward and they should have been
miserable from
that procedure. However, they had both decided to use ClaraDerm spray.
Each used
it from the first time to the bathroom and then for several weeks
afterward. Neither had one
single bit of discomfort, let alone pain — no swelling, itching,
inflammation.

And they never had to use any of the things provided by the hospital.

Claraderm works amazingly for itch
Author: Gulie Molkenthin
Location: Kimmell, IN, United States
Posted: 2008-07-27

This may sound gross to anyone who has not suffered the itch of Candida.
I’m detoxing from arsenic poisoning and the arsenic flooding out has
turned
my ph VERY acidic. I have NEVER been so acidic in my memory! The
result is Candida and irritation of ‘delicate tissues’. In fact the itch
was
driving me NUTS. I tried
Melrose splashes, yogurt, apple cider vinegar,
garlic paste and maybe a few other things I can’t recall.

This AM after my shower, I splashed on some Claraderm. I ordered it
since it was going to be discontinued and discovered that it healed some
‘toxic bumps’ that came up on my nose because of the arsenic detox, so
I just grabbed it this AM. Instant relief and it has lasted for hours.

For Tender Tush, visit this link to the testimonials site. You’ll also find other testimonials for Clara derm.

We’ll back be in the New Year. We have lots of info to share with you after a recent conference call with Gary Young from Ecuador.

Both I and Anthony would like to take this opportunity to wish you all, and your families, much peace and joy in this festive season.

See you in 2011.

Gavina

Disclaimer: Please remember that anything discussed here does not
constitute medical advice and cannot substitute for appropriate medical care. Where essential oils are mentioned, it’s recommended you use only pure, unadulterated therapeutic grade essential oils and follow the safety directions of the manufacturer.

On the Frankincense Trail in Oman, Part Two

A NASA photo of Salalah, its port and the Jabal Qar'a mountains in Dhofar Oman. Conditions in this region are just right for Frankincense trees to grow.

Last week, we looked at how Young Living used their Seed to Seal process to bring an essential oil on to the market – specifically the Frankincense from Oman. This week, we’ll check out the Sacred Frankincense (Boswellia Sacra), the kind of environment it grows in, the country that Young Living will be harvesting it from – Oman – and the uses and benefits of using this essential oil.

About the Frankincense Tree

The photo from NASA shows the region of Dhofar. This is the only region in Oman, that Frankincense trees will grow and thrive in.

Frankincense loves limestone and they’ll often be found growing in rock. When near water, it will grow like a tree, but when the area is dry it will resemble more of a bush.

In actual fact, frankincense trees don’t like too much water, as the tree is susceptible to mildew. For that reason you will often find the trees growing high up (as in the Jabal Qar’a mountains in Dhofar) or in the dry wadis (or valleys) at low altitude.

The mountains in Dhofar are also close to the sea, and June to August is the summer monsoon period (known as the Khareef). The trees thrive on the moist air, that comes up in mountain mists.

Frankincense trees have to be at least 6 years old before they can be harvested for their resin. The tree flowers in May (which I’m told is the best time to visit this region and see the trees) with harvesting taking place in the  following months.

The green tree bark is cut down to the red cambrium layer, to release the resin from the tree. In under a minute, a white resin (known as Luban) starts to ooze out from the tree. This first cutting is not collected. The resin from the second and third cuttings is collected, with each tree producing up to a kilo of resin each year. It will take each tree about a year for its scars to heal.

The white resin, Luban, after cutting back the green tree bark. Courtesy of C Woolley

Once the resin has been exposed to the air, it dries. This allows the tree to begin healing. Courtesy of C Woolley

After the resin has dried, it’s cut of from the tree, de-barked, sorted and graded. The very best grade is reserved for the Sultan Qaboos and most of the rest of it will end up being sold to other Arabian princes, sultans and kings.

The dried resin is cut from tree only after the second and third cuttings. Courtesy of C Woolley

Sorting and grading of Frankincense. Courtesy of C Woolley.

Sultan Qaboos and his two treasures

Sultan Qaboos’ two treasures are: his people and his frankincense. Only Omanis are allowed to harvest the resin, with rights to the respective trees being owned by tribes or families. At the top of the season, a kilo of resin will sell for $300-$400 and in the low season, about $100 a kilo. About 99% of all frankincense resin will be used by Omanis to burn in clay burners. To obtain the essential oil of frankincense, we need to steam distill (hydrodistilled) the resin. It takes about 16 hours to process each batch of resin.

Frankincense resin. To obtain the essential oil, this resin is distilled with steam. Courtesy of C Woolley

The Young Living Distillery

In early 2010, Young Living Essential Oils partnered up with Dr Mahmoud Suhail, M.D., and obtained commercial and industrial licences for frankincense oil research and production. Dr Suhail was able to assist Young Living to find local sources of consistent high quality Boswellia Sacra resin and in February 2010, the first batch of Sacred Frankincense essential oil was produced.


Differences in Frankincense.

There are several species of frankincense and they are definitely not the same.

Boswellia Carterii which grows in East Africa (Somalia and Ethiopia) is high in Incensol and Incensol Acetate, and has been found to be beneficial against cancer, depression and anxiety.

Sacred Frankincense from Oman, is very high in boswellic acids, sesquiterpenes and diterpenes (more on why this is important later).

Boswellia Frereana, the other species that grows in East Africa contains no Boswellic acids, Incensol and Incensol Acetate. It has little to no therapeutic value, being mostly used to burn in churches and for use in perfumes.


Benefits of Sacred Frankincense

Being high in boswellic acids, sesquiterpenes and diterpenes, this essential oil is very psycho-active. Sesquiterpenes are molecules which have the capacity to cross the blood-brain barrier, and so assist in more oxygen and nutrients reaching the human brain.

Sacred Frankincense is great for meditation, spiritual healing and emotional healing. It helps:

  • Dissolve negativity, insecurity and fear
  • Helps to ease feelings of bereavement
  • Reduces re-occurring nightmares
  • Guards your feelings of self-worth and purpose.
  • It fights against feelings of depression and assists with moments of anxiety.

How to use it

  • Breathe it in a handkerchief
  • Diffuse it in your environment
  • Spritz it on cloth in the clothes dryer
  • Add it to your massage oil
  • Add it to a foot bath or your bath-water
  • Add a drop to your personal care products, such as skin care creams.

That concludes our report on Dr Cole Woolley’s visit to Australia

Till Next time,

Cheers

Anthony

About Dr Cole Woolley:

Dr Cole Woolley obtained his doctorate in chemistry from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He has spent 20 years working and consulting with Fortune 500 companies to develop products in the areas of foods, pharmaceuticals, flavours, petrochemicals, beverages, and analytical equipment. While living in Pennsylvania, he developed more than 150 devices and inventions in addition to giving hundreds of technical presentations in many different countries. Dr Woolley’s most recent endeavours have involved the development of nutritional products and subsequently marketing these health and wellness products around the world. He has helped formulate over 50 nutritional products, and has created strong product recognition by way of his expert writing skills.

On the Frankincense Trail in Oman Part One

Last week, I outlined the 3 steps to nutritional balance, as put forward by Dr Cole Woolley. This week and next, I’ll share with you Dr Woolley’s experiences with the harvesting and distillation of Sacred Frankincense (Boswellia Sacra) in Oman. Frankincense resin CANNOT be legally shipped out of Oman, therefore Gary Young of Young Living Essential Oils, decided to build a distillery in Oman itself. The Frankincense oil, distilled from the resin, can legally be shipped out. Most of the photos came to me courtesy of Cole Woolley (Thank you Cole.  🙂 ).

Sacred Frankincense (Boswellia Sacra) grows in Yemen, Oman and the island of Socotra. The other species of Frankincense, Boswellia Carterii, grows in East Africa. Picture courtesy of C Woolley

Seed to Seal

Dr Woolley explained to us that Young Living Essential Oils (YLEO) utilise a 5-step Seed to Seal process to ensure its essential oils are potent and  therapeutic grade in quality. Throughout his presentation he used Frankincense as an example of this process. The five steps are:

1.  Seed. Plant species are authenticated by YLEO utilising scientific research, field studies and university partnerships
2.  Cultivation. Plants are cultivated on YLEO farms or on partner/co-op farms where these farms meet YLEO’s strict quality standards. If YLEO have to buy from other farms/producers, the guiding principle is that they want them AS IS, nothing added and nothing subtracted – Pure and unadulterated.
3.  Distillation. Essential oils are distilled in the correct manner, utilising a proprietary low-temperature, low-pressure steam distillation process. This ensures beneficial compounds in the plant’s oil remain uncompromised.
4.  Testing. Oils extracted have to go through stringent testing – at least 7 major tests before they are ready for shipping. This ensures that the optimal natural compounds are present in the oil. YLEO uses its own labs, in addition to third-party audits, to check that international purity and potency standards are met and surpassed.
5.  Seal. Each bottle is carefully sealed. Research and testing continue on the finished product to add to the growing knowledge bank on essential oils.

With that explained, let’s see how the process worked with Sacred Frankincense in Oman.

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Do you work in an environment that’s stressful, where you’re frequently dealing with upset or stressed out customers? Maybe like a bank or insurance company. Or perhaps you work in a clinic, where your clients are waiting anxiously, e.g. a dentist. And what about the staff or employees who work with you or for you? Would you be interested in improving their mood and performance? If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions then you’ll be happy to know that essential oils can help you out here.

A number of scientific studies carried out over the years have shown that the aromas of essential oils can and do affect our mood and performance (see the papers listed at the end of this article). While one of these studies used an oil burner, we strongly recommend an oil diffuser for the best effect. 

How can aromas or smelling essential oils affect our mood you may ask? The sense of olfactory (smell) is hardwired into the brain. When you inhale a fragrance, the odor molecules attach themselves to receptor cells sites inside the nasal membrane. When stimulated by odor molecules, these nerve cells triggers electrical impulses to the olfactory bulb in the brain. The olfactory bulb then transmits these impulses to the gustatory centre (where the sensation of taste is perceived), the amygdala (where emotional memories are stored), and other parts of the limbic centre in the brain. The limbic centre is connected to the parts of the brain that control heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, memory, stress levels, and hormonal levels. This is one way in which essential oils can have physiological and psychological effects. [1]

So what oils are best?

If you are trying to improve work performance (your own and others), try diffusing Peppermint and Lemon oils in your office. If you find yourself flagging or getting a little sleepy in mid-afternoon (especially after a big lunch) try inhaling a little peppermint or putting a couple of drops in a glass of water ( TipInhaling a little peppermint can even come in handy when you’re driving and finding yourself getting sleepy behind the wheel ).  Lemon has been found to help reduce depression and stress when inhaled. [2]  Think of the possibilities here, if you work in a clinic or counselling practice; not to mention the busy customer service counter of a bank or insurance office.

Another oil that has been tested in a clinical environment is Lavender. In a study reported in the International Journal of Nursing Practice, 85% of respondents to a questionnaire said that there had been a positive improvement in the work environment following the use of Lavender oil burners (imagine if they had used diffusers). [3]. The Essential Oils Desk Reference also lists the following oils as beneficial in dealing with anger and agitation: Bergamot, Cedarwood, Frankincense, Rose, Sandalwood and Ylang Ylang*.

 Some might ask is it ethical to change the mood of your customers or co-workers? Isn’t it like brain-washing? My answer to this is that I’ve been in many situations where I wished I had kept a cool head. Sometimes our emotions get in the way of rational discussions. Sure, there are times we need to be assertive, but not a lot is achieved by blowing our stack either. Essential oils can play a role in improving our workplaces. If you would like more information on the oils mentioned in the article please contact us. If you would like to buy any of them, please visit our website

Till Next time

Cheers

Anthony 

Research Papers:

Hirsch A R, Johnston L H. Odors and Learning. J. Neurol Orthop Med Surg. 1996; 17:119-126

Komori T, Fujiwara R, Tanida M, Nomura J. Application of fragrances to treatments for depression. Hihon Shinkei Seishin Yakurigaku Zasshi. 1995 Feb; 15(1):39-42

Komori T, Fujiwara R, Tanida M, Nomura J. Effects of citrus fragrance on immune function and depressive states. Neuroimmunomodulation. 1995 May-Jun; 2(3): 174-80

Moss M, Cook J, Wesnes K, Duckett P. Aromas of Rosemary and Lavender Essential Oils Differentially Affect Cognition and mood in healthy adults. Intern. J. Neuroscience. 2003; 113:15-38

Moss M, Hewitt S, Moss L, Wesnes K. Modulation of cognitive performance and mood by aromas of peppermint and ylang-ylang. Intern. J. Neuroscience. 2008; 118:59-77

Nasal, C, et al. Functional imaging of effects of fragrances on the human brain after prolonged inhalation. Chemical Senses. 1994; 19(4): 359-64

Tysoe P. The effect on staff of essential oil burners in extended care settings. International Journal of Nursing Practice. 2000; 6:110-112

 Yim V W C, Ng A K Y, Tsang H, Leung A Y. A Review on the effects of aromatherapy for patients with depressive symptoms. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2009; 15(4):187-195

Disclaimer: Please remember that anything discussed here does not
constitute medical advice and cannot substitute for appropriate medical care. Where essential oils are mentioned, it’s recommended you use only pure, unadulterated therapeutic grade essential oils and follow the safety directions of the manufacturer.

Footnotes:  

 * A study carried out at the University of Northumbria found that Peppermint enhanced memory while Ylang Ylang impaired it, and that peppermint increased alertness while Ylang Ylang decreased it. Ylang Ylang though was shown to increase calmness. So maybe use Ylang Ylang in the area where your customers or patients are waiting, but Peppermint in the back office. 

[1] Chapter 2,  The Powerful Influence of Aromas on Both Mind and Body , Essential Oils Desk Reference, p12

[2] Komori, Fujiward, Tanida, Nomura, Yokoyama “Effects of citrus fragrance on immune function and depressive states”. Neuroimmunomodulation. 1995 May-Jun;        2(3):174-80

[3]Tysoe P. The effect on staff of essential oil burners in extended care settings. International Journal of Nursing Practice. 2000 6:110-112