In my last post, I discussed some of the medical research that has been undertaken on Frankincense. This week I want to outline some of the ways in which Frankincense has been, and is being, used.

The Essential Oils Desk Reference lists the medical properties of Frankincense as being anti-tumoral, immuno-stimulant, antidepressant and muscle relaxing. [1] We also know that this essential oil is beneficial to the health of the skin, having been used for this purpose (along with such oils as Myrrh, Sandalwood, Geranium, Rosewood and Roman Chamomile) throughout recorded history. [2]

Not surprisingly, when I did a search on Frankincense on the site Essential Oil Testimonials, I found that skin cancers, tumours and numerous skin ailments cropped up as the most common uses for Frankincense. I also found Frankincense being successfully used for mental illnesses such as depression and bi-polar. How does Frankincense work in the body to be able to do all these things you may ask?

Frankincense contains sesquiterpenes, molecules capable of penetrating the blood/brain barrier, which renders it capable of stimulating the limbic part of the brain (Incidentally this is the centre of memory and emotions), the hypothalamus, pineal and pituitary glands. The Hypothalamus in turn, is the master gland of the body which produces many of hormones such as thyroid and growth hormone. Read the rest of this entry