Aromatherapy Handbook for beauty, hair and skin care
Those of you who like me are concerned about the less than natural content in our personal care products (hair, skin care, toiletries, etc) will find this book of great value.
Erich Keller starts by describing the history and essence of modern day cosmetics and moves on to talk about what was the original source of cosmetics – essential oils.
So much of what we use today is not only denuded of therapeutic grade essential oils, but replaced with synthetics that can harm us.
Keller’s book gives people an alternative to this.
You’ll find:
  • information on the key ingredients found in natural cosmetics.
  • dealing with different skin types and hair types
  • recipes for skin care, aromatic baths, hair care and natural perfumes.
The format of the book makes it easy to use and refer back to.
All in all you’ll get great benefits from this book if you’re the kind of person interested in making their own grooming products.

Buy the book

Till next time
Cheers
Anthony

Twenty ways to use Lavender oil

Lavender oil is one essential oil you should definitely have in the first aid kit. I just wrote a post on Wellbeing blog – 20 Ways to use Lavender oil – in which I give you some tips on how to get the most out this wonderful essential oil.

Till next time

Cheers

Anthony

In my last post, I discussed some of the medical research that has been undertaken on Frankincense. This week I want to outline some of the ways in which Frankincense has been, and is being, used.

The Essential Oils Desk Reference lists the medical properties of Frankincense as being anti-tumoral, immuno-stimulant, antidepressant and muscle relaxing. [1] We also know that this essential oil is beneficial to the health of the skin, having been used for this purpose (along with such oils as Myrrh, Sandalwood, Geranium, Rosewood and Roman Chamomile) throughout recorded history. [2]

Not surprisingly, when I did a search on Frankincense on the site Essential Oil Testimonials, I found that skin cancers, tumours and numerous skin ailments cropped up as the most common uses for Frankincense. I also found Frankincense being successfully used for mental illnesses such as depression and bi-polar. How does Frankincense work in the body to be able to do all these things you may ask?

Frankincense contains sesquiterpenes, molecules capable of penetrating the blood/brain barrier, which renders it capable of stimulating the limbic part of the brain (Incidentally this is the centre of memory and emotions), the hypothalamus, pineal and pituitary glands. The Hypothalamus in turn, is the master gland of the body which produces many of hormones such as thyroid and growth hormone. Read the rest of this entry